Recent Changes

Monday, April 4

Sunday, August 30

  1. page Chapter 15 Sequoia edited ... South Fork Kern segment 3: ROS: Roaded Natural, VQO: Retention (USDA 1988b). South Fork Kern …
    ...
    South Fork Kern segment 3: ROS: Roaded Natural, VQO: Retention (USDA 1988b).
    South Fork Kern segment 2: ROS: Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized, VQO: Preservation (USDA 1988b).
    ...
    Kern to ‍15‍‍15 people per day‍day‍‍ (https://fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_058516.pdf), while
    Kings and Kings South Fork Designated Wild and Scenic River
    Segment 2 of the Kings, the Kings Middle Fork and the Kings South Fork Rivers were designated into law in November 1987. In addition, a 48,000-acre Special Management Area consisting of the Kings River Further Planning Area was designated including the four miles of Wild and Scenic River (Segment 2) plus an additional 13.0 miles of the river (Segment 3, 4, and 5) that was not specifically designated Wild and Scenic. The South Fork Kings River flows 40.5 miles from headwaters in Kings Canyon National Park and through the SQF to confluence with Middle Fork and Main Kings. The Middle Fork flows through the Sierra National Forest. The Kings River (Segments 2, 3, 4, and 5) forms the boundary between the Sierra National Forest and the SQF from confluence of Middle Fork and South Fork Kings Rivers to Pine Flat reservoir. A recommendation on Kings River segments 3, 4, and 5 (Segment 1 in the LRMP 1988) for Wild and Scenic designation was deferred in the 1988 forest planning process (USDA 1988a). An eligibility assessment for segments 3, 4, and 5 from the 1595 feet elevation to Pine Flat Reservoir was completed for the Implementation Plan for the Kings River Special Management Area; Kings, Kings South Fork and Kings Middle Fork Wild and Scenic Rivers in 1991 (USDA 1991a).
    ...
    Not designated as Wild and Scenic but included in the KRSMA. Located from Pine Flat Reservoir to Garlic Meadow Creek. Length - 13 miles. This segment extends upstream far enough to contain the maximum impoundment which could be created if a dam at Rodgers Crossing was ever constructed. A recommendation on this segment for Wild and Scenic designation was deferred in this planning process. For this reason, detailed information is not presented for this segment (USDA 1988b). Condition:
    Kings River Segment 2
    ...
    the area. ‍Rafting‍‍Rafting does not
    ...
    access (USDA 1988b).‍1988b).‍‍
    This section of river provides an outstanding whitewater recreation opportunity. Whitewater kayaking and rafting has occurred on this section of river for at least 20 years, and is described by skilled kayakers as "a great run." See http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/224 for pictures and a description.
    Kings River Segment 3
    ...
    Current Management
    The area is managed for dispersed recreation only and maintains a wilderness character with no recreation improvements. The ROS is Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized. Recreation use is virtually non-existent due to the very limited access. This area was not included in 1984 when the addition to the Domeland Wilderness was made due to two competing requests for FERC licenses for the development of hydroelectric projects. No hydroelectric development will occur (USDA 1991). VQO –Partial Retention (USDA 1988a).
    ‍Segments‍‍Segments potentially eligible pending suitability studies‍studies‍‍
    Eligibility screening
    ...
    screening of ‍eleven streams‍‍‍eleven streams‍‍ were assessed
    Little Kern Segment (1803000102-07A)
    Western Divide Ranger District
    ...
    Updated Wild and Scenic River Eligibility Inventory
    The Forest Planning Rule requires an updated inventory be included as an appendix in all new forest plans. Where past inventories have been completed, new information and/or changed conditions should trigger updates to the inventory. Many factors have changed since the last Forest Plan was finalized over two decades ago, including recreational changes and increased understanding regarding climate change. As a result and updated inventory is timely.
    T‍heT‍‍he following reaches
    ...
    their eligibility. ‍‍
    a. Middle Fork Tule
    The Middle Fork Tule offers a spectacular Class IV-V whitewater run from Camp Nelson to Springville/Globe (Lake Success). With scenic waterfalls that provide clean lines, the Middle Fork Tule is an excellent creek run for skilled whitewater kayakers.
    ...
    The Kings River forms the boundary between the Sequoia National Forest and the Sierra National Forest. It is Wild and Scenic for 5 miles from confluence of the Middle Fork and South Fork Kings to Garlic Meadow Creek. From Garlic Creek downstream to Kirch Flat Campground, the river provides outstanding whitewater opportunities and stunningly scenic granite cliffs and dependable flows in the early spring through summer. __http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/224/__
    __http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/225/__
    ‍These‍‍These rivers and
    ...
    be surveyed. ‍‍
    Wilderness
    Monarch Wilderness
    ...
    Other Unique Features or ValuesScenic views are abundant and of significant value(USDA 1988b).
    Summary of Current Condition of Wilderness Character
    ‍Potential‍‍Potential Need and Opportunity for Wilderness‍Wilderness‍‍
    Inventoried Roadless Areas
    Inventoried roadless areas possess social and ecological values and characteristics that are becoming scarce in an increasingly developed landscape. They provide significant opportunities for dispersed recreation, large relatively undisturbed landscapes that provide privacy and seclusion, and are often sources of water that communities treat and distribute for public use. In addition these areas provide a bulwark against the spread of invasive species, often provide important habitat for rare plant and animal species, conserve biological diversity, and provide opportunities for study, research, and education (USDA 2000).
    ...
    The portion of the KRSMA in the SQF is bounded on the north by the Kings River and within the Giant Sequoia National Monument. The KRSMA has the only OHV trails in the Monument, as authorized by the legislation that created special management area. The area is generally steep with brush and grass covered canyons, 1,000 feet to 5,000 feet in elevation, not very accessible, and provides great opportunities for solitude. Native American use and needs may preclude some interpretation. Millwood staging area and Mill Flat Campground are the access points to this area via the Davis Road (12S01). The existing OHV routes are currently impassable, even for a dirt bike. During the historic logging period, a flume was maintained along Mill Flat Creek to the Kings River originating at the town of Millwood.
    Management challenges include risks associated with wildfire aggravated by extremely steep slopes. Visitation in these areas is very limited due to vegetation and terrain. ROS: Semi-Primitive Motorized, Roaded Natural, SIO: High, Moderate
    ‍References‍Clinton,‍‍References‍‍Clinton, W.J. 2000
    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service 1979a. Cannell Meadow Trail establishment report Sequoia National Forest. Porterville, CA. Sequoia National Forest. 4 p.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service 1979b. Jackass Creek establishment report NRT nomination. Porterville, CA. Sequoia National Forest. 7 p.
    (view changes)
    11:04 am
  2. page Chapter 15 Sequoia edited ... South Fork Kern segment 3: ROS: Roaded Natural, VQO: Retention (USDA 1988b). South Fork Kern …
    ...
    South Fork Kern segment 3: ROS: Roaded Natural, VQO: Retention (USDA 1988b).
    South Fork Kern segment 2: ROS: Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized, VQO: Preservation (USDA 1988b).
    ...
    Kern to 15‍15 people per dayday‍ (https://fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_058516.pdf), while
    Kings and Kings South Fork Designated Wild and Scenic River
    Segment 2 of the Kings, the Kings Middle Fork and the Kings South Fork Rivers were designated into law in November 1987. In addition, a 48,000-acre Special Management Area consisting of the Kings River Further Planning Area was designated including the four miles of Wild and Scenic River (Segment 2) plus an additional 13.0 miles of the river (Segment 3, 4, and 5) that was not specifically designated Wild and Scenic. The South Fork Kings River flows 40.5 miles from headwaters in Kings Canyon National Park and through the SQF to confluence with Middle Fork and Main Kings. The Middle Fork flows through the Sierra National Forest. The Kings River (Segments 2, 3, 4, and 5) forms the boundary between the Sierra National Forest and the SQF from confluence of Middle Fork and South Fork Kings Rivers to Pine Flat reservoir. A recommendation on Kings River segments 3, 4, and 5 (Segment 1 in the LRMP 1988) for Wild and Scenic designation was deferred in the 1988 forest planning process (USDA 1988a). An eligibility assessment for segments 3, 4, and 5 from the 1595 feet elevation to Pine Flat Reservoir was completed for the Implementation Plan for the Kings River Special Management Area; Kings, Kings South Fork and Kings Middle Fork Wild and Scenic Rivers in 1991 (USDA 1991a).
    ...
    Not designated as Wild and Scenic but included in the KRSMA. Located from Pine Flat Reservoir to Garlic Meadow Creek. Length - 13 miles. This segment extends upstream far enough to contain the maximum impoundment which could be created if a dam at Rodgers Crossing was ever constructed. A recommendation on this segment for Wild and Scenic designation was deferred in this planning process. For this reason, detailed information is not presented for this segment (USDA 1988b). Condition:
    Kings River Segment 2
    ...
    the area. Rafting‍Rafting does not
    ...
    access (USDA 1988b).1988b).‍
    This section of river provides an outstanding whitewater recreation opportunity. Whitewater kayaking and rafting has occurred on this section of river for at least 20 years, and is described by skilled kayakers as "a great run." See http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/224 for pictures and a description.
    Kings River Segment 3
    ...
    Current Management
    The area is managed for dispersed recreation only and maintains a wilderness character with no recreation improvements. The ROS is Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized. Recreation use is virtually non-existent due to the very limited access. This area was not included in 1984 when the addition to the Domeland Wilderness was made due to two competing requests for FERC licenses for the development of hydroelectric projects. No hydroelectric development will occur (USDA 1991). VQO –Partial Retention (USDA 1988a).
    Segments‍Segments potentially eligible pending suitability studiesEligibilitystudies‍
    Eligibility
    screening was
    ...
    screening of eleven streams‍eleven streams‍ were assessed
    ...
    Kern Segment (1803000102-07A)Western(1803000102-07A)
    Western
    Divide Ranger
    Forest Boundary to Table Meadow Creek.
    ORVs: Recreation, fisheries
    ...
    Kern Segment (1803000102-07B)Western(1803000102-07B)
    Western
    Divide Ranger
    Table Meadow Creek to the Kern River.
    ORVs: Recreation, fisheries
    ...
    Updated Wild and Scenic River Eligibility Inventory
    The Forest Planning Rule requires an updated inventory be included as an appendix in all new forest plans. Where past inventories have been completed, new information and/or changed conditions should trigger updates to the inventory. Many factors have changed since the last Forest Plan was finalized over two decades ago, including recreational changes and increased understanding regarding climate change. As a result and updated inventory is timely.
    TheT‍he following reaches
    ...
    their eligibility.
    a.

    a.
    Middle Fork Tule - The
    The
    Middle Fork
    __https://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/5091/__
    http://www.awetstate.com/MTule.html
    ...
    Mill Flat Creek: MillCreek
    Mill
    Flat Creek
    ...
    https://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/251/
    c. Kern: TheKern
    The
    Kern River
    __https://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/220/__
    __https://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/221/__
    __https://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/222/__
    d. Brush Creek: BrushCreek
    Brush
    Creek is
    http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/2297
    ...
    Dry Meadow Creek: DryCreek
    Dry
    Meadow Creek
    __http://www.awetstate.com/DryMeadowCreek.html__
    f. King’s River: TheRiver
    The
    Kings River
    __http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/River/detail/id/225/__
    These‍These rivers and
    ...
    be surveyed.
    WildernessMonarch WildernessThe

    Wilderness
    Monarch Wilderness
    The
    Monarch Wilderness
    The Sierra National Forest manages the northwest portion of the Monarch Wilderness and the SQF manages the southwest portion. A wilderness management implementation plan does not exist for the Monarch Wilderness. The Hume Lake Wilderness Education Plan 20007 covers this area.
    Scenic attributes include giant sequoia groves, expansive views from the high ridges into deep canyons, conifer forests and lush meadows. The VQO is Preservation and the ROS ranges from Roaded Natural to Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized to Semi-Primitive Motorized.
    ...
    Current Condition of the Outstanding Opportunities for Solitude or a Primitive and Unconfined Type of Recreation Quality of Wilderness CharacterLimit party size to 15 persons and 25 head of stock. There is no data or monitoring effects to identify the solitude or a primitive and unconfined type of recreation quality. The monitoring of this quality is scheduled to begin FY2013. The only access to the wilderness is from the SQF. Visitation is very light because of the steep terrain. Recreation opportunities include hiking and stock use, hunting and dispersed camping.
    Other Unique Features or ValuesScenic and geologic features exist, description and current condition is unknown at this time. Other features also may exist.
    South Sierra WildernessTheWilderness
    The
    63,000-acre South
    In the Sequoia NF portion of the South Sierra Wilderness, elevations range from 6,000 feet near Kennedy Meadows to 9,455 feet at Crag Peak. The terrain is mostly rolling with large meadows lying between low forested ridges of mixed conifers. Stands of quaking aspen border most meadows. There are over 30 miles of streams which contain trout. A portion of the South Fork Kern Wild and Scenic River bisects this wilderness. The wilderness contains approximately 25 miles of trails. The Pacific Crest Trail bisects this wilderness (USDA 1988a) There are breeding populations of California golden trout in some streams (USDA 1991b).
    South Sierra Wilderness Implementation Plan and Environmental Assessment, March 1991 (USDA 1991b) and the Pacific Crest Trail management plans. The Kern River Ranger District is responsible for managing this resource and coordinating with the Inyo National Forest. VQO is Preservation and ROS Primitive and Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized (1988a).
    ...
    Other Unique Features or Values
    Summary of Current Condition of Wilderness Character
    Golden Trout WildernessTheWilderness
    The
    Golden Trout
    Golden Trout Wilderness Plan 1982 calls for restoration and enhancement and the Pacific Crest Trail management plans. ROS: Primitive, Semi-primitive non-motorized, VQO: Preservation. Western Divide Ranger District is responsible for managing this resource and coordinating with the Inyo National Forest.
    Current Condition of the Untrammeled Quality of Wilderness Character
    ...
    Other Unique Features or Values
    Summary of Current Condition of Wilderness Character
    Dome Land WildernessThisWilderness
    This
    wilderness is
    The revision for the Management Plan for the Dome Land Wilderness 1979, identified in the 1988 LRMP was never accomplished. Kiavah and Dome Land Wilderness Education Plan 2012 and the Pacific Crest Trail management plans. 94,544 acres of the wilderness are within the SQF and about one third of the wilderness is located on BLM lands and was designated in 1984. ROS: Majority is Semi-primitive non-motorized with some Primitive and VQO: Preservation. Kern River Ranger District is responsible for managing this resource and coordinating with the BLM. Volunteers maintain much for the trail system.
    Current Condition of the Untrammeled Quality of Wilderness Character
    ...
    Current Condition of the Outstanding Opportunities for Solitude or a Primitive and Unconfined Type of Recreation Quality of Wilderness CharacterThe heaviest use originates out of Big Meadow trailheads to Manter Meadow. Wilderness use is generally light in the SQF (NVUM 2006). Limit party size 15 persons and 25 head of stock. No quotas or visitor permit system.
    Other Unique Features or ValuesSummary of Current Condition of Wilderness Character
    Jennie Lakes WildernessLocatedWilderness
    Located
    on the
    No management plan exists but the Hume Lake Ranger District Wilderness Education Plan 20007 covers this area. Hume Lake Ranger District is responsible for managing this resource and coordinating with Park Service that administers neighboring wilderness.
    Stewardship partners are essential to maintain or improve the wilderness character in the Jennie Lakes Wilderness. The partners include the Student Conservation Association (SCA) and the High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew (HSVTC). These partners have provided many hours to maintain the trail system, to monitor campsite impacts, and to make educational visitor contacts.
    ...
    Other Unique Features or ValuesNo significant features have been identified.
    Summary of Current Condition of Wilderness CharacterThere is no data or monitoring efforts to summarize current condition of wilderness character.
    Kiavah WildernessTheWilderness
    The
    most southeastern
    There is no management plan, but the area is covered under the Kiavah and Dome Land Wilderness Education Plan 2012 and the Pacific Crest Trail management plans. Kern River Ranger District is responsible for managing this resource and coordinating with the BLM who manages the other portion of the Kiavah Wilderness on BLM lands and adjoining wildernesses(USDA 1988b).
    Current Condition of the Untrammeled Quality of Wilderness Character
    ...
    Other Unique Features or ValuesScenic views are abundant and of significant value(USDA 1988b).
    Summary of Current Condition of Wilderness Character
    Potential‍Potential Need and Opportunity for WildernessWilderness‍
    Inventoried Roadless Areas
    Inventoried roadless areas possess social and ecological values and characteristics that are becoming scarce in an increasingly developed landscape. They provide significant opportunities for dispersed recreation, large relatively undisturbed landscapes that provide privacy and seclusion, and are often sources of water that communities treat and distribute for public use. In addition these areas provide a bulwark against the spread of invasive species, often provide important habitat for rare plant and animal species, conserve biological diversity, and provide opportunities for study, research, and education (USDA 2000).
    ...
    {ROADLESSWILD.jpg}
    Research Natural Areas
    Scenic BywayKingsByway
    Kings
    Canyon Scenic BywayKingsByway
    Kings
    Canyon Scenic
    The byway is popular year round however the majority of the use is in the summer months. The road into the canyon from the Hume Lake turnoff is closed during the winter months.
    The byway is managed by the Hume Lake Ranger District and is in the Giant Sequoia National Monument. The Kings Canyon Scenic Byway Management Guidelines provide guidance for recreation and interpretive development. The Giant Sequoia National Monument Plan 2012 provides direction for natural resource management. The Hume Lake Ranger District personnel is responsible for coordinating with the National Park Service in managing this attraction. ROS is Roaded Natural and the SIO is high.
    ...
    The portion of the KRSMA in the SQF is bounded on the north by the Kings River and within the Giant Sequoia National Monument. The KRSMA has the only OHV trails in the Monument, as authorized by the legislation that created special management area. The area is generally steep with brush and grass covered canyons, 1,000 feet to 5,000 feet in elevation, not very accessible, and provides great opportunities for solitude. Native American use and needs may preclude some interpretation. Millwood staging area and Mill Flat Campground are the access points to this area via the Davis Road (12S01). The existing OHV routes are currently impassable, even for a dirt bike. During the historic logging period, a flume was maintained along Mill Flat Creek to the Kings River originating at the town of Millwood.
    Management challenges include risks associated with wildfire aggravated by extremely steep slopes. Visitation in these areas is very limited due to vegetation and terrain. ROS: Semi-Primitive Motorized, Roaded Natural, SIO: High, Moderate
    ReferencesClinton,‍References‍Clinton, W.J. 2000
    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service 1979a. Cannell Meadow Trail establishment report Sequoia National Forest. Porterville, CA. Sequoia National Forest. 4 p.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service 1979b. Jackass Creek establishment report NRT nomination. Porterville, CA. Sequoia National Forest. 7 p.
    (view changes)
    10:55 am

Sunday, June 28

  1. page Inyo NF September 2, 2013 Snapshot Pages edited ... Please note that these snapshots were taken on September 2, 2013 and the current content on th…
    ...
    Please note that these snapshots were taken on September 2, 2013 and the current content on the Living Assessment may be different. This process of taking a snapshot was done so the authors of the Forest Assessment could rely upon a fixed base on information, rather than on information that could change at any time. Throughout the plan revision process, when appropriate, the Living Assessment along with other sources of information will be checked to ensure that the best available scientific information is considered.
    These documents are saved as Adobe portable document format (PDF).
    Note: Although the header on the pdf documents say 9/3/2013, the snapshot was taken on 9/2/2013
    Inyo National Forest Chapters:
    Chapter 1: Assessing Terrestrial, Aquatic, and Riparian Ecosystems {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch01_20130903.pdf}
    (view changes)
    2:23 pm
  2. page Chapters edited ... Note: Summary documents reflect the Bio-region and many have not been updated. Snapshot Files…
    ...
    Note: Summary documents reflect the Bio-region and many have not been updated.
    Snapshot Files - Used to develop Forest Assessments
    ...
    Forest (September 3,2, 2013)
    Sierra National Forest (July 2, 2013)
    Sequoia National Forest (August 2, 2013)
    (view changes)
    2:20 pm
  3. page Inyo NF September 2, 2013 Snapshot Pages edited ... on September 3, 2, 2013. These ... on September 3, 2, 2013 and These documents are sa…
    ...
    on September 3,2, 2013. These
    ...
    on September 3,2, 2013 and
    These documents are saved as Adobe portable document format (PDF).
    Inyo National Forest Chapters:
    (view changes)
    2:17 pm
  4. page Inyo NF September 2, 2013 Snapshot Pages edited ... These documents are saved as Adobe portable document format (PDF). Inyo National Forest Chapt…
    ...
    These documents are saved as Adobe portable document format (PDF).
    Inyo National Forest Chapters:
    ...
    1: Assessing Terrestrial Ecosystems, Aquatic Ecosystems,Terrestrial, Aquatic, and Watersheds {Sierra National Forest - Ch01_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}Riparian Ecosystems {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch01_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 2: Air, Soil, Riparian Areas, and2a: Air Resources {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch02_Air_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 2b: Soil Resources {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch02_Soil_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 2c:
    Water Resources {Sierra National Forest - Ch02_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch02_Water_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 3:
    ...
    and Stressors {Sierra National Forest - Ch03_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch03_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 4: Assessing Carbon {Sierra National Forest - Ch04_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch04_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 5:
    ...
    Planning Process {Sierra National Forest - Ch05_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch05_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 5: Appendix A: Terrestrial and Aquatic At-risk Species {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch05_AppA_Terrestrial_Aquatic_At-Risk_Species.pdf}
    Chapter 5: Appendix B: Plant At-risk Species {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch05_AppB_Plant_At-Risk_Species.pdf}
    Chapter 5: Appendix C: Pinyon Expansion Mapping within Sage-grouse Habitat {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch05_AppC_Pinyon_Expansion_Mapping.pdf}
    Chapter 5: Appendix D: Species Accounts for Plant Species at Risk {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch05_AppD_Support_Doc_Plant_Spp_Accounts.pdf}

    Chapter 6:
    ...
    Economic Conditions {Sierra National Forest - Ch06_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch06_21030902.pdf}
    Chapter 7:
    ...
    Plan Area {Sierra National Forest - Ch07_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}
    Chapter 8: Assessing Multiple Uses - Water {Sierra National Forest - Ch08-water_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}
    {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch07_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 8:
    ...
    Plants and Wildlife {Sierra National Forest - Ch08-fishwildlifeplants_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}
    Chapter 8: Assessing Multiple Uses -
    Wildlife, Water, Timber, and Range {Sierra National Forest - Ch08-range_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}
    Chapter 8: Assessing Multiple Uses - Timber {Sierra National Forest - Ch08-timber_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}
    {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch08_All_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 9:
    ...
    Scenic Character {Sierra National Forest - Ch09_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch09_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 10:
    ...
    Mineral Resources {Sierra National Forest - Ch10_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch10_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 11: Assessing Infrastructure {Sierra National Forest - Ch11_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch11_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 12:
    ...
    Tribal Importance {Sierra National Forest - Ch12_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch12_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 13:
    ...
    and Uses {Sierra National Forest - Ch13_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch13_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 14:
    ...
    Access Patterns {Sierra National Forest - Ch14_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}{INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch14_20130903.pdf}
    Chapter 15:
    ...
    Designated Areas {Sierra National Forest - Ch15_formatted 07-02-2013.pdf}
    In addition, some Bio-regional Chapters were referenced to augment information found on the Inyo NF Chapters or where a Inyo NF Chapter was not completed:
    Bioregional Chapter 1: Assessing Terrestrial Ecosystems, Aquatic Ecosystems, and Watersheds - Terrestrial {Sierra National Forest - BR_Ch01_Terrestrial_formatted 07-18-2013.pdf}
    Bioregional Chapter 1: Assessing Terrestrial Ecosystems, Aquatic Ecosystems, and Watersheds - Aquatic {Sierra National Forest - BR_Ch01_Aquatic_formatted 07-18-2013.pdf}
    Bioregional Chapter 1: Assessing Terrestrial Ecosystems, Aquatic Ecosystems, and Watersheds - Riparian {Sierra National Forest - BR_Ch01_Riparian_formatted 07-18-2013.pdf}
    Bioregional {Sierra National Forest - BR_Ch03_formatted 07-18-2013.pdf} Chapter 3: Assessing System Drivers and Stressors {Sierra National Forest - BR_Ch03_formatted 07-18-2013.pdf}
    Bioregional Chapter 4: Assessing Carbon {Sierra National Forest - BR_Ch04_formatted 07-03-2013.pdf}
    Bioregional {Sierra National Forest - BR Ch08-water 07-03-2013.pdf} Chapter 8: Assessing Multiple Uses - Water {Sierra National Forest - BR Ch08-water 07-03-2013.pdf}
    {INF_ForestTopicDraft_Ch15_20130903.pdf}
    (view changes)
    2:14 pm

More